Britney Cox

Britney Cox is a writer from Huntington, WV. She has two Bachelor of Arts degrees in Literary Studies and Creative Writing. She is currently working on her Masters in English, and she plans to pursue her doctorate eventually in hopes of becoming a professor (though her longtime dream is to work in the entertainment industry). Her passions include reading, writing, theatre, and listening to Taylor Swift.

Articles By Britney Cox

By: Britney Cox — August 4, 2022
All of the exciting things are starting to happen! You have received your admissions letter in the mail. You have accepted your admissions decision and figured out your financial aid. Next up? The daunting task of deciding your living arrangements. First, you have to choose your physical living arrangements. Do you choose a dorm on campus or an off-campus apartment? We are sure you have read all about the benefits of living on campus in a dorm, and not only this, but most colleges require you to live on campus any where from one to two years. There is another issue at hand: how do you pick a roommate?
By: Britney Cox — August 4, 2022
It’s finally time to start applying to college! You have everything you need to start—transcripts, personal essays, FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), personal information, and video submissions. Once you begin submitting all the needed documents, you are stopped by a page asking for your banking information or a credit card. Colleges often charge you to apply to their programs. College application fees can vary, anywhere from $10 to $100, depending on where you apply. Though this may not seem like a lot, these fees start to add up if you apply to multiple programs and colleges. Not to mention, you have likely already paid to take the ACT or SAT, courses to take those tests, and trips to those colleges. All the fees can intimidate a student from a low-income family, but these costs do not have to be a barrier to access. Many colleges offer waived fees to students for low-income families, and colleges often offer deals through emails and at certain times of the year.
By: Britney Cox — August 30, 2022
Finding school supplies is one of the more exciting moments of returning to school. Shops display back-to-school stations that tempt us every time we walk through. However, college is a bit different than high school regarding necessary supplies. Some new supplies include laptops, notebooks, pens or pencils, a planner, folders, a stapler, and a printer. This article will help you shop for the things you need that last throughout your college experience.
By: Britney Cox — August 29, 2022
The time has come for you to start packing for college. You likely already know what you will bring from home: your laptop, chargers, medicine, shampoo, etc. Then you go online and see your friends and classmates buying bulk supplies from Target and Home Goods. Though you might have to buy some things for your dorm, you do not need everything in the back-to-school section. This article will attempt to help reduce the number of items you bring to college, highlighting only the essentials for your dorm room and your college experience. You do not want to be that person that brings two or more full cars for just a dorm room.
By: Britney Cox — July 13, 2022
While navigating the college experience, one of the more difficult challenges is understanding your study habits and how you learn. It can be easy to assume that your study habits will remain the same as in high school. However, college presents with different challenges that might throw you off about what you understand as studying. The key to effective studying is finding out how you learn and how you can make your learning process a reality. This can be a trial-and-error process as there is no way to know how you study best automatically. There are often several factors when it comes to how you learn: comfort, environment, noise levels, music, and time management.
By: Britney Cox — September 1, 2022
Congratulations! You just completed the first semester of college and packed things to go home for winter break. Then, you get an email from your advisor. "Have you registered for classes yet?" You are used to having advisors make schedules for you—whether for your first semester of college or high school. So, how exactly do you register for courses? This article helps you build your college schedule for your second semester and get you ready for beyond your second semester.Congratulations! You just completed the first semester of college and packed things to go home for winter break. Then, you get an email from your advisor. "Have you registered for classes yet?" You are used to having advisors make schedules for you—whether for your first semester of college or high school. So, how exactly do you register for courses? This article helps you build your college schedule for your second semester and get you ready for beyond your second semester.
By: Britney Cox — September 19, 2022
Each semester in college brings new challenges. Where are you going to live? What classes are you going to take? How many credit hours can you withstand? Should you get a job? One persistent question, however, always emerges. How will I pay for my textbooks this semester? Textbooks are, unfortunately, a necessity in college, and a single course can have multiple textbooks. Those prices add up quickly. So, what should you do? This article helps you navigate where to find textbooks, how to pay for them, and how to evaluate if you even need them.
By: Britney Cox — September 19, 2022
Do you ever feel completely disconnected from the students around you while sitting in a class? How do they sit there taking notes and retaining the information? Are you somehow less intelligent than the people around you? The answer is no.
By: Britney Cox — September 19, 2022
Throughout your academic career, you might hear people talking about keeping a resume, CV (Curriculum Vitae), or other professional documents to show your skills, education, and work experience to future employers. You might think this is too far away for you to take seriously. You might read this as a high school or college freshman. Here is the thing: you will always need some resume-related document to obtain employment, even while in college. You might even decide you want a job while in college. A solution to organizing your experiences for a resume is to get a LinkedIn account. LinkedIn is a free and easy-to-navigate website. There are plenty of opportunities on the website to get your career and your resume a jump start.
By: Britney Cox — August 31, 2022
When going into college, you'll have to prepare for all the questions family and friends may ask for the next four years.